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spacerJanuary 2003, Issue No. 4


arrowWanted: Small Geothermal Businesses

Are you a small geothermal business or developer?

Do you run a small geothermal greenhouse, fish farm, district or space heating facility, spa or resort, small power plant (less than 10 MWe), or other geothermally-fueled business?

If so—we need you.

Please complete our short online Small Geothermal Business Survey.

Your input will help future geothermal developers and entrepreneurs.


 

National Conference of State Legislatures Issues Geothermal Policy Report

Farm Bill Supports Renewable Energy on the Farm

 

What's Going On
A calendar of events of interest in the 19 states of GeoPowering the West, and across the U.S.A.

State Roundup
A summary of what is going on in the region as a whole, and the GeoPowering the West states

Current Solicitations
Money available from state and federal governments and private sources

Tell us what you think...
Send us your comments, story ideas, state news, etc.

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National Conference of State Legislatures Issues Geothermal Policy Report

The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), with technical assistance from the Washington State University (WSU) Energy Program and financial assistance from the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Program, has issued a State Legislative Report on "Geothermal Energy: A Primer on State Policies and Technology."

The 13-page report outlines geothermal energy's benefits and the challenges its development faces, explains how geothermal energy contributes to economic development, details the technical and regulatory barriers to geothermal resources' greater use, and introduces common approaches that states are using to develop or expand various renewable energy resources.

The report concludes that:

Renewable energy technologies such as geothermal power can protect customers from volatile energy prices, enhance national energy independence, and stimulate economic development. Geothermal power plants generate steady and reliable baseload power, occupy very little land, and emit no nitrogen oxides and very low amounts of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide. The nation’s hottest resources are located in the West, but useful low temperature resources are found in nearly every state. Although the costs have decreased during the last few decades, exploration and drilling remain expensive and gaining access to resources can be cumbersome, especially on federal lands. Many states, with both restructured and regulated utility markets, have enacted a variety of policy options to create incentives to develop or expand their renewable energy resources.

NCSL's mission is to help state legislators, legislative staff, and other policymakers learn about specific geothermal energy policies and technologies, and make informed decisions on how to support the development of geothermal energy in their states and regions. With NCSL's involvement, state legislators crafting energy policy are confident that the information they receive is unbiased and balanced. By focusing on the potential for both district heating and electricity generation from geothermal resources, the report aims to provide useful policy information that can be applied in a wide array of states.

NCSL State Legislative Report header

To obtain a copy of the "Geothermal Energy: A Primer on State Policies and Technology" report, contact Troy Gagliano of NCSL at Tel: (303) 303-364-7700, ext. 1404 or email at troy.gagliano@ncsl.org.

For more information on NCSL and WSU's policy work, contact Troy Gagliano at NCSL, or Dr. R. Gordon Bloomquist of the WSU-Energy Program at Tel: (360) 956-2016 or email at bloomquistr@energy.wsu.edu.

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Farm Bill Supports Renewable Energy on the Farm

The Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 incorporates the first ever Energy Title. Title IX of the Farm Bill fosters rural clean energy development from renewable sources, including geothermal. Specifically, it authorizes $405 million over five years and establishes several new energy programs. Sections 9005 and 9006 are of particular importance.

  1. Section 9005—Energy Audit and Renewable Energy Development Program

    Section 9005 creates a program to conduct assessments of renewable energy potential for farmers, ranchers, and rural small businesses. State energy offices and agricultural departments, regional energy organizations, Indian Tribe energy offices, land-grant colleges and universities, rural electric coops, and nonprofits are eligible for grants.

    Funds can be used to help farmers, ranchers and rural small businesses seek funding under Section 9006 of Title IX, or any other funding to implement proposals. Those receiving audits/assessments must share at least 25% of the costs. Funds are authorized, but not specified, for years 2002-2007. A funding request will be considered as part of the FY2003 budget process. For more information, contact Blaine D. Stockton, USDA Rural Utilities Service Electric Program, Tel: (202) 720-9545 or email at bstockto@rus.usda.gov.

  2. Section 9006— Renewable energy systems and energy efficiency improvements

    Under Section 9006, farmers, ranchers, and rural small businesses are eligible for loans, loan guarantees, and grants to buy renewable energy installations and invest in energy efficiency. From 2003-2007, $23 million is authorized annually for this program. Grants can cover up to 25% of the total project cost, while a loan-grant combination can cover up to 50%. Loan interest will be comparable to similar Treasury issues. For renewable energy systems, key factors in being awarded funding include the expected amount of energy to be generated and environmental benefits.

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has yet to determine the respective shares of grants, loans, and loan guarantees. A USDA group is working closely with DOE to draft criteria for issuing funds. For more information, contact William F. Hagy, III, USDA Rural Business-Cooperative Service, Tel: (202) 720-7287 or email at bill.hagy@usda.gov.

Additional information can be found on the USDA's Farm Bill 2002 website, the Environmental Law & Policy Center website, and the Harvesting Clean Energy website.

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What's Going On

  • 30 January
    Arizona Geothermal Working Group Meeting
    Phoenix, AZ
    Email: Amanda Ormond at asormond@msn.com

  • 10-11 February
    Harvesting Clean Energy Conference III
    Held in partnership with the 8th Annual Idaho Ag Summit
    Boise, ID
    Website
  • 10-12 February
    Energy Outlook Conference
    Organized by the National Association of State Energy Officials
    Washington, D.C.
    Website

  • 12-14 February
    16th Annual Campus Energy Conference
    International District Energy Association (IDEA)
    Austin, TX
    Website

  • 26 February
    Alaska Geothermal Working Group Meeting
    Anchorage, AK
    Email: Gerry Nix at gerald_nix@nrel.gov

  • 4-6 March
    Electric Power 2003
    Houston, TX
    Website

  • 24-26 March
    7th Annual Distributed Generation & On-Site Power Conference
    Houston, TX
    Website

  • 25-26 March
    Building a Renewable Energy Portfolio Conference
    Houston, TX

  • 15-16 April
    National Tribal Sustainability Conference 2003
    Santa Ana Pueblo, NM
    Website

  • 22-24 April
    Earth Technologies Forum
    Washington, D.C.
    Website
  • 22-24 June
    94th Annual International District Energy Association (IDEA) Conference & Trade Show
    Philadelphia, PA
    Website

  • 7-8 August
    Southwest Renewable Energy Conference
    Flagstaff, AZ
    Website

  • 8-10 August
    Southwest Renewable Energy Fair
    Flagstaff, AZ
    Website

  • 26-28 August
    Nevada Energy Showcase
    Elko, NV

  • 18 September
    Arizona Geothermal Working Group Meeting
    Phoenix, AZ
    Email: Amanda Ormond at asormond@msn.com

  • 12-15 October
    Geothermal Resources Council (GRC) 2003 Annual Meeting
    Held in conjunction with the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE)
    Morelia, Mexico
    Website

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State Roundup

Send your news, events, etc. to the Editor.

Select a state and hit "Go."



Regional

  • According to the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) "Annual Energy Outlook 2003 with Projections to 2025," total renewable electricity generation, including combined heat and power, is projected to increase from 298 billion kWh in 2001 to 495 billion kWh by 2025, an annual increase of 2.1%. Renewable technologies are projected to grow slowly due to the relatively low costs of fossil-fired generation and because competitive electricity markets favor less capital-intensive natural gas technologies over coal and baseload renewables. State renewable portfolio standards and the extension of the Federal Production Tax Credit for wind and biomass are factored into EIA's forecast. For more information, see the EIA press release.

  • High-ranking leaders from both parties representing industry, government, academia, labor, and environmental groups have united to form the National Commission on Energy Policy (NCEP). NCEP will develop a series of policy recommendations on key energy issues which affect long-term U.S. national security, environmental safety, and economic prosperity. The Commission will hold a series of public forums beginning in early 2003, and produce interim studies. In order to avoid politicizing its ultimate policy recommendations, the final report will not be issued until after the 2004 Presidential election. NCEP is co-chaired by Harvard Professor John P. Holdren; William K. Reilly, World Wildlife Fund Chairman and former EPA Administrator; and Exelon Corporation Chairman and CEO John W. Rowe. It receives financial support from several foundations.

  • The Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Clearinghouse provides consumer energy information, including fact sheets, brochures, videos, and publications, on energy efficiency and renewable energy. The Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Network (EREN) is a gateway to energy efficiency and renewable energy information sources.

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Alaska

  • 26 February
    Alaska Geothermal Working Group Meeting
    Anchorage, AK
    Email: Gerry Nix at gerald_nix@nrel.gov

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American Samoa

  • American Samoa, a territory of the United States located in the South Pacific Ocean, is dependent on diesel imports for power. The American Samoa Power Authority (ASPA) is interested in exploring geothermal development for Tutuila, the main volcanic-formed island. Mike Dworksky, Engineer and Planner of the ASPA Wastewater Division, has taken the lead in exploring the island's geothermal potential, and is preparing a report for the ASPA management and board. For more information, email Mike Dworksky at miked@aspower.com

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Arizona

For further information on the Arizona Geothermal Work Group (AzGeo), contact:

Amanda Ormond
The Ormond Group
Tel: (480) 491-3305
Email: asormond@msn.com

  • 30 January
    Arizona Geothermal Work Group Meeting
    Phoenix, AZ
    Email: Amanda Ormond at asormond@msn.com

  • 11-12 August
    Southwest Renewable Energy Conference
    Flagstaff, AZ
    2002 Website

  • 18 September
    Arizona Geothermal Work Group Meeting
    Phoenix, AZ
    Email: Amanda Ormond at asormond@msn.com

  • A team of Northern Arizona University (NAU) scientists has begun a Phase I research project to assess the geothermal potential of volcanic areas near Flagstaff. A $186,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy will allow NAU adjunct geology professors, Wendell Duffield and John Sass, and geology professor, Paul Morgan, to conduct surface studies and determine whether geothermal energy exists in the San Francisco Volcano Field. The San Francisco volcanic field contains about 800 extinct volcanoes at an elevation of 8,000-9,000 feet. If a resource is found, the study could be followed by drilling for a more in-depth assessment. "If this kind of [high enthalpy] geothermal energy can be harnessed, it might be able to satisfy most or all of Flagstaff's demands for electricity with energy that is clean compared to plants powered by oil, coal, natural gas, and nuclear fuels," said Sass. For more information, contact Dr. Paul Morgan, Tel: (928) 523-7175, or via email at paul.morgan@nau.edu.

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California

  • The U.S. Department of the Interior and USDA Forest Service, reversing an earlier decision, approved in November 2002 development by Calpine Corporation of a 48 MWe geothermal power plant at Telephone Flat, near Medicine Lake on the Modoc National Forest in Siskiyou County. The agencies found that the environmental analysis, conducted under provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), was still valid. The increased national and state focus on renewable energy, along with the further mitigation measures required, justified approval of the project. Calpine will be required to conduct several mitigation measures, e.g., addressing concerns raised by American Indian Tribes and others, including realigning its proposed power line to reduce visual and environmental impacts. Calpine owns 43 federal leases covering 47,800 acres in the Medicine Lake Highlands. The site has been in development since 1997. For more information, see the Department of Interior press release.

  • Calpine Corporation recently signed five-year power purchase and sales agreements with Pacific Gas and Electric Company and the State of California Department of Water Resources. The agreements call for the delivery of 110 MW of on-peak and up to 55 MW of off-peak geothermal power beginning 1 January 2003. Power delivered under the agreements will come from The Geysers in Northern California. Calpine expects the contract to generate annual revenue of approximately $40 million. For more information, see Calpine's press release.

  • In comments during the California Energy Commission Committee Hearing on Renewable Energy Program held 13 December 2002, Gregg Morris of the Green Power Institute commented that $16 billion to $20 billion of new renewable investment would be required to meet the 20% Renewable Portfolio Standard over the 15-year period. Geothermal production capacity would have to be at least doubled; wind at least tripled. For more information, see the Transcript of the Committee Hearing (in PDF format).

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Colorado

No news.

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Hawai'i

  • Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) announced the formation of a new HECO subsidiary—Renewable Hawai'i, Inc.—on 3 January. The new subsidiary, which will invest in renewable energy projects, will be initially capitalized at $10 million. More funding will follow as projects that merit support are presented to the company. In her pre-election “Agenda for a New Beginning,” Governor Linda Lingle set forth a goal of 20% renewable energy use by 2020. In 2001, HECO and its neighbor island subsidiaries, Hawai'i Electric Light Company and Maui Electric Company, obtained about 7% of electric sales from renewable sources, compared to a U.S. average of 2%. For more information, see the HECO press release.

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Idaho

For further information on the Idaho Geothermal Working Group, contact:

Gerry Galinato
Energy Division,
Idaho Department of Water Resources
Tel: (208) 327-7963
Email: ggalinat@idwr.state.id.us
  • 10-11 February
    Harvesting Clean Energy Conference III
    Held in partnership with the 8th Annual Idaho Ag Summit
    Boise, ID
    Website

  • The Idaho Geothermal Working Group will participate in the Harvesting Clean Energy Conference III in Boise, 10-11 February. Geothermal will be on the agenda with a presentation on direct use by Kevin Rafferty of the Geo-Heat Center in the On-Farm Energy session. Marilyn Nemzer of the Geothermal Education Office will exhibit at the the conference, spreading the word about geothermal energy.

  • US Cobalt Inc. (USC) announced an agreement with First Associates Inc. of Toronto for a $1 million equity financing to advance the development of the 10-MWe Raft River geothermal power plant in December 2002. The company hopes to complete financing in February or March 2003, and begin well testing in April or May. The plan is to start construction in 2004 and have the plant online by late 2004 or early 2005. The resource has an estimated potential of 90 MWe.

    On 3 April 2002, USC announced that it will acquire all of the issued and outstanding shares and warrants of US Geothermal Inc. (USGEO), a private Idaho corporation that has the right to acquire from Vulcan Power Company of Bend, OR a 100% interest in the Raft River Project. USGEO acquired an additional 3,159 acres of geothermal leases surrounding the Raft Ri-ver project in Summer 2002. In addition, on 29 September 2002, USGEO was awarded a $265,097-DOE Geothermal Resource Exploration and Development (GRED) grant that will pay for 80% of the Phase 1 production and injection test program. (Source: The Times-News, Twin Falls, Idaho, 17 December 2002). For more information, contact Doug Glaspey, President, USC, Tel: (208) 841-5573 or via email at dglaspey@uscobalt.com.

  • Idaho may have renewable energy legislation introduced in the 2003 legislative session. Proposed bills would call for an income tax credit for capital investment in alternative energy sources and the passage of an Alternative Energy Power Act. Both will face intense scrutiny by power companies, consumers, and others. Action to promote renewable energy is relatively new to the Idaho Legislature.

  • Several geothermal projects are in the works in Idaho. The University of Idaho will use the well at its Kimberly operations to expand into warm water aquaculture. The City of Cascade is looking into re-vegetation plant operations, using the Boise-Cascade mill that closed. Other promising businesses that could use geothermal water in the state are mushroom growing, and the raising of prawns and shrimp.

  • The Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR) Energy Division led a Geothermal Trade Mission to Reno, NV 18-19 November 2002. Twenty-five Idahoans—including three state representatives, a state senator, two county commissioners, and development personnel from two counties—headed south to learn more about geothermal uses, policies, and regulations in Nevada.

    On the first day, the group toured Brady Geothermal Power Plant and the Gilroy Foods plant which uses geothermal water to dry onions for McDonald's® hamburgers, Lipton® Soup, Shillings® spices, and other foods. On the second day, the group had a panel discussion with the Nevada Public Utility Commission, Sierra Pacific Power, the Nevada Division of Minerals, and the Bureau of Land Management. Subjects covered included: Nevada's Renewable Portfolio Standards, the Energy Credit Trading System, well construction regulations, and geothermal development on Federal Lands in Nevada. |

    For more information on the trade mission and geothermal in Idaho, contact Ken Neely or Warren Weihing at the IDWR at (208) 327-7900 or 1-800-334-SAVE (Idaho), or see the Idaho Geothermal website.



    Senator Joe Stegner examines the onion samples dried by geothermal water at the Gilroy Foods facility.






 

 

 

 

 

 



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Kansas

No news.

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Montana

  • Under the Alternative Energy Revolving Loan Program, more than $425,000 will soon be available in five-year, $10,000 loans, to help homeowners pay for alternative energy systems, including geothermal. The low-interest loans are part of a revolving fund created by the 57th Montana Legislature in 2001. Program rules will be adopted after the public comment period this month; first loans will be available in early 2003. For more information, and to obtain an application, see the Montana Department of Environmental Quality website.

  • The nonprofit organization, Montanans for Responsible Energy Development (MRED) , was formed in late 2002 in Miles City. The organization will focus on how the state can use its natural resources to help boost the state's and local communities' economies. Chaired by State Senator Mack Cole (R-Hysham), members include county commissioners, legislators, business people, and individuals. The group will promote the development of wind, water, land, coal, natural gas, coalbed methane, ethanol, bio-diesel, oil, and solar as alternative energy sources. No mention is made of geothermal. For more information, see the MRED Mission Statement (PDF format), or contact Senator Cole at Tel: (406) 342-5400.

  • Montana Green Power has compiled a list of Montana incentives based on information from the Database of State Incentives for Renewable Energy (DSIRE). DSIRE is a comprehensive source of information on state, local, utility, and selected federal incentives that promote renewable energy. "Montana Renewable Energy Incentives" is available in PDF format.

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Nebraska

No news.

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Nevada

For further information on geothermal in Nevada, contact:

John Snow
Program Manager - Oil, Gas, and Geothermal
Nevada Division of Minerals
Tel: (775) 684-7045
Email: jsnow@govmail.state.nv.us

  • 26-28 August
    Nevada Energy Showcase
    Elko, NV

  • The Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe and Advanced Thermal Systems, Inc. (ATS), a geothermal energy company, signed a Letter of Intent on 28 October 2002 to create a joint venture to develop the geothermal resources on the Tribe’s reservation north of Reno. ATS will initially perform a series of pre-development studies to determine the feasibility of constructing geothermal power facilities and associated ancillary businesses using the breakthrough Kalina Cycle technology for electric power generation. Power could be sold to Sierra Pacific Resources or a buyer in California. ATS will only develop sites that are acceptable to the Paiutes, avoiding areas that have religious or cultural significance. Construction is scheduled to begin in late 2003. Senator Harry Reid (D-NV) applauded the agreement. For more information, see the ATS press release.

  • Brady Power Partners is constructing an additional energy conversion unit at the existing Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant in Churchill County. The project will incorporate a state-of-the-art binary geothermal energy conversion unit, and add 5 MWe to the existing 21.1 MWe dual flash plant, which went online in 1992. ORMAT Nevada, Inc., a member of the ORMAT Group of Companies, purchased the partnership interests in Brady Power Partners from FPL Energy, LLC., and the Tomen Group in July 2001.

  • ORMAT Nevada Inc. and Sierra Pacific Resources signed two contracts in November 2002 for renewable energy supply that could furnish up to 60 MWe to Nevada Power Company and Sierra Pacific Power Company. The contracts will help bring Nevada into compliance with the Renewable Portfolio Standard. According to Lucien Bronicki, chairman of ORMAT, "These new contracts will be the basis for ORMAT's expanding geothermal development in Nevada." For more information, see ORMAT's press release.

  • In addition to 60 MWe from ORMAT Nevada, Inc., Nevada Power has contracted to purchase electricity from Advanced Thermal Systems, Inc.'s Kalina cycle 42-MWe binary geothermal plant in Washoe County; and from Earth Power Resources, Inc.'s binary geothermal plant in Elko County. According to Jack McGinley, manager of long-term planning for Nevada Power and Reno-based Sierra Pacific Power Co., over 20 years the price of geothermal power is close to that of conventional fuels such as natural gas, costing "only" $3.1 million more than conventional power over the 20-year. "Three million over 20 years is a wash," McGinley said. For more information, see the Nevada Power press release.

  • To help the development of renewable energy resources in Nevada, the state's Public Utilities Commission (PUC) adopted a temporary regulation on 20 November 2002 to allow energy providers to buy and sell renewable energy credits through the Renewable Energy Credit (REC) trading program. One credit will represent a kilowatt-hour of electricity generated from renewable power sources. Energy providers that generate more renewable power than required can sell the excess credits to other energy providers within the state. For more information, see the Nevada PUC announcement (in PDF format).

  • A property consisting of about 1002 acres in Lovelock, Pershing County is available for lease to an interested entity who is willing to explore and/or utilize the geothermal resources. The subject property was previously leased by Union from 1976 to 1996. For more information, contact Magdi Boutros by Tel: (702) 683-4685 or by email at MagdiBoutros@lvcm.com.

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New Mexico

For further information on the New Mexico Geothermal Working Group, contact:

Christopher Wentz
Director, Energy Conservation and Management Division
New Mexico Energy, Minerals & Natural Resources
Tel: (505) 476-3312
Email: cwentz@state.nm.us

  • 15-16 April
    Sustainability 2003 - A National Tribal Sustainability Conference
    Santa Ana Pueblo, NM
    Website

  • After almost two years of negotiations, the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission unanimously approved Rule 3619 on 17 December 2002. A Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS), Rule 3619 requires public utility companies to produce 5% of the energy they generate for New Mexico customers from solar, wind, hydropower, biomass, or geothermal sources by 2006. In addition, generation from renewables must increase by at least 1% per year until an RPS of 10% is attained in 2011. The commission introduced a weighted system of renewable energy certificates to encourage investment in diverse types of renewable energy. Under this system, each kWh of electricity generated by geothermal counts for 1 kWh toward compliance while electricity generated by wind or hydroelectric counts for 1/2 kWh toward compliance. Other factors being equal, preference will be given to renewable energy generated inside the state.

  • The Geothermal Energy Program at the Southwest Technology Development Institute (SWTDI), located on the campus of New Mexico State University, promotes the development of geothermal energy in the state. Specifcally, it 1) provides technology transfer; 2) characterizes NM geothermal resources and develops cost effective methods and approaches to find and manage the resource base; and 3) assists and launches economic and energy development centered on geothermal energy. New Mexico has the largest acreage of geothermally-heated greenhouses in the nation, including the two largest geothermal greenhouses operations. For more information, see the SWTDI website, or contact James C. Witcher, Tel: (505) 646-3949, or via email at jwitcher@nmsu.edu.

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North Dakota

No news.

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Oklahoma

No news.

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Oregon

For further information on geothermal activities in Oregon, contact:

Kevin Rafferty
Associate Director, Geo-Heat Center
Oregon Institute of Technology
Tel: (541) 885-1750
Email: raffertk@oit.edu

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South Dakota

No news.

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Texas

  • 12-14 February
    16th Annual Campus Energy Conference
    International District Energy Association (IDEA)
    Austin, TX
    Website

  • 4-6 March
    Electric Power 2003
    Houston, TX
    Website

  • 24-26 March
    7th Annual Distributed Generation & On-Site Power Conference
    Houston, TX
    Website

  • 25-26 March
    Building a Renewable Energy Portfolio Conference
    Houston, TX

  • According to Dr. Richard Erdlac, a geophysicist with the Center for Energy and Economic Diversification, the Permian Basin could become a reliable source of geothermal energy. Using the existing oilfield infrastructure, and the basin's abundant supply of hot, subterranean brine, the area could become a major supplier of electrical power to Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico. Erdlac unsuccessfuly applied for DOE funding to conduct a $1.5 million, two-year study of wells in the Delaware Basin.

  • According to an update to the third edition of the Retail Energy Deregulation Index (RED Index), Texas leads the country in restructuring its electric market. Conducted by the Center for the Advancement of Energy Markets (CAEM), the RED Index measures the progress states have made in moving from the monopoly model of public utility regulation to the competitive model. The index is based on 22 attributes that CAEM has identified as the foundation for an effective transition to competition. Ken Malloy, CEO of CAEM, commented that the best news on electricity restructuring comes from overseas. “While England has long been recognized as a leader in energy restructuring, the surprise is how much further ahead England is than the U.S. and Canada,” he said. For more information, see the CAEM's press release.

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Utah

No news.

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Washington

For further information on geothermal activities in Washington, contact:

Gordon Bloomquist
Geothermal, Hydrothermal & Integrated Energy Systems
Washington State University
Tel: (360) 956-2016
Email: bloomquistr@energy.wsu..edu

  • House Bill 2247 in 2001 required 16 Washington State electric utilities to offer retail customers an option to purchase qualified green power, including geothermal, and to report annually on their progress. According to the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission's (UTC) December 2002 report to the legislature, fewer than one percent (0.55%) of customers on average have registered to participate in the utility programs in the first year. A total of 12.4 million kWh of green power was sold during the first nine months of 2002 with wind power representing 90% of the green power sales. in this year's program. The remaining resources were landfill gas, hydropower, and solar. The report, "Green Power Programs in Washington: A Report to the Legislature," is available on UTC's website.

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Wyoming

  • Deep Heat Energy Corporation (DHEC) of Cody has a new drilling technology for Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal systems. The first design the company engineered produces large volumes of hot water for oil sands recovery. The company is also working on different geothermal production designs to attempt to get to a higher absolute temperature at the surface. DHEC is looking for other direct applications that could use large volumes of hot water or lower temperature steam, as well as potential sites for a demonstration project for higher heat values that would support a binary plant. For more information, contact Bill Langdon, President, DHEC, Tel: (307) 527-7072 or via email at blangdon@deepheatenergy.com, or see DHEC's website.

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Current Solicitations

The following solicitations and requests for proposals may be of interest to geothermal developers and entrepreneurs.

U.S. Department of Agriculture
Rural Utilities Service
High Energy Cost Grant Program

Due 7 February

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Rural Utilities Service announces the new High Energy Cost Grant Program to assist communities where the average residential expenditure for home energy exceeds 275% of the national average.

Grants funds may be used to acquire, construct, extend, upgrade, and otherwise improve energy generation, transmission, or distribution facilities. Eligible facilities include on-grid and off-grid renewable energy systems and implementation of cost-effective demand side management and energy conservation programs that benefit eligible communities.

The number of grants awarded will depend on the number of applications
submitted, the amount of grant funds requested, and the quality and competitiveness of applications submitted. The maximum amount for a grant request that will be considered for funding under this notice is $5 million. The minimum amount of grant application is $75,000. A total of $14.9 million is expected to be available.

Applications are due 7 February 2003.

For more information, see the USDA Rural Utilities Service High Energy Cost Grant Program web page, or contact Karen Larsen, USDA, at (202) 720-9545.

California Energy Commission (CEC)
PIER Environmental Area Exploratory Grant Solicitation

Due 1 March

The California Energy Commission’s PIER Environmental Area (PIEREA) Team is requesting proposals for research projects through its Exploratory Grant Program.

The mission of the PIEREA program is to develop cost-effective approaches to evaluating and resolving environmental effects of energy production, delivery, and use in California, and to explore how new electricity applications and products can solve environmental problems. Renewable energy is one of the six PIER subject areas.

The Exploratory Grant Program is designed to tap into the broad research community to help ensure that PIEREA is open to research opportunities in the full range of energy-related environmental issues relevant to the mission of the PIEREA Program.

The following listed types of activities are examples of the sorts of research activities
eligible for funding:

  1. Improved analytical methods, models
  2. Small-scale field demonstration
  3. Collection and analysis of existing and new data
  4. Literature reviews
  5. Surveys or interviews with experts
  6. Market or technology assessments/surveys
  7. Meta-analysis studies

The program should enhance the current PIEREA research portfolio by funding focused projects in areas that are not presently being considered. The maximum amount of any individual grant award will be $75,000. Approximately $675,000 of PIER funds will be allocated to PIEREA Exploratory grants. There are no matching fund requirements associated with the PIEREA Exploratory Grant Program, however, cost sharing is encouraged.

The deadline for receipt of grant applications is 5:00 PM PST, 1 March 2003.

For program information, see the PIER Energy-Related Environmental Research website. To download the request for proposal, see the CEC website.

On 28 and 29 January, the CEC will hold workshops on the PIER Program Energy-Related Environmental Research Exploratory Grant Solicitation. For details, see the CEC website.

U.S. Department of Energy
Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships - Phase I
Solicitation # DE-PS26-03NT41713

Due 1 April

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requests proposals for Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships. DOE formally announces this intent to an array of organizations so that they can begin to collaborate.

This solicitation will directly support the President's Global Climate Change Initiative (GCCI) goal of:

  1. Reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18% by 2012, and,
  2. Ensuring that a suite of commercially-ready sequestration technologies are available for the 2012 technology assessment mandated by the GCCI.

Organizations include but are not limited to: The public, private landowners, climate change and environmental special interest groups, academicians, community leaders, county/city planners, commissioners, engineers, mining and power generation industry, oil and gas industry, forest product industry, and other commercial businesses.

Partnerships would be chartered to evaluate options and potential opportunities for regional CO2 storage and capture, CO2 transport, regulatory permitting, communication and outreach, public acceptance, monitoring and verification requirements, and environmental efficacy of sequestration in their multi-state region(s).

Total funding expected is $8 million to $10 million. Twenty percent cost-share is required. Funding for four to ten partnerships is anticipated for a period of up to 24 months.

Responses are due 1 April 2003.

For more information, see the DOE Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) web page, or contact Martin Byrnes, DOE, at (412) 386-4486.

Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance
Unsolicited Proposals

Open-ended

The Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance is looking for fresh, innovative ways to save electric energy in the region. Their goal is to make products and services that use electricity more efficiently available and affordable to consumers and businesses in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington.

The unsolicited proposal process has four steps. The initial submission is a response to 10 questions about the proposed project and has a maximum length of six pages. If,
after initial review of the Proposed Project Idea Application, Alliance staff determines that the idea meets the organization's funding criteria, project portfolio goals, and has the potential to be a successful project, staff and the applicant will continue to develop the proposal through successive review phases.

For more information, see the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Unsolicited Proposal web page.

U.S. General Services Administration
Refreshed Solicitation for Energy Services (ES)
TFTP-EJ-000871-1

Proposals are accepted on a continuous basis.

The U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) has issued a “refreshed” solicitation for companies interested in being included on the Worldwide Federal Supply Schedule for Energy Services from which the U.S. Government contemplates award of contracts for supplies/services listed.

Types of Energy Services include:

  • Energy Management Program Support (includes but not limited to Energy Planning and Strategies, Energy Choice Analysis, Billing and Management Oversight);
  • Energy Audit Services (includes but not limited to Energy Audits, Use of Alternative Energy Sources, Resource Efficiency Management, Building Commissioning Services);
  • Managing the Procurement and Use of Natural Gas;
  • Managing the Procurement and Use of Electricity (includes but not limited to Supplying Renewable (Green) power to customers in deregulated markets, and Emergency Power Sources); and
  • Introduction of New Services.

Proposals are accepted on a continuous basis. For more information, call (800) 241-7246 and select ENERGY prompt, see the FBO Daily Issue of 17 July 2002, FBO #0227, solicitation notice in PDF format, or send an email to energy@gsa.gov.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

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The Geothermal biz.com newsletter is produced for the U.S. Department of Energy, Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Geothermal Technologies Program under Contract No. DE-PS01-01EE10781-1J.

Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the U.S. Government or any agency thereof.


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